Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Love and Games in Buenos Aires







Happy Independence Day!


I was surprised to read negative reviews on The Foreigners by Maxine Swann. Someone wrote that they wanted to read about Buenos Aires and that this book did not talk about the city at all. Yet, I thought the complete opposite. The book IS about Buenos Aires, as seen through the eyes of three extremely different women - Daisy, a divorced American who travels to the city to get away from her past; Isolde, a lonely Austrian woman who finds comfort in the arts; and Leonarda, an Argentine woman whose moods and looks change from moment to moment. These three women present the city in all its beautiful and seedy glory as they attempt to make a life for themselves. Swann's writing reminds me of my friend's work, author Elise Blackwell - dreamlike, engaging, and well told.

Daisy, after arriving in the city, sets up in a less than desirable apartment while attempting to work on a grant project. She meets Leonarda through an ad for people who want to learn English, only to find out that Leonarda speaks perfect English. Together, the two embrace danger while telling lie on top of lie, all the while giving into what they desire. Leonarda even asks Daisy for help in a Master Plan - an attempt to seduce a well known Argentine man, yet Daisy suspects that even darker forces are at work. Isolde comes into the picture through Daisy and is shown to be a woman who wants something yet is not really sure what it is. She is herself when it comes to cocktail parties and art openings but without it, she is like a canvas with no paint. The three women go in search of what they think will make them happy and as it turns out, it's not what they expected.

To be honest, I wasn't sure if I was going to enjoy this book, yet once I began reading Daisy's words, I found that I couldn't put it down. I turned each page, wondering what they were going to do next. Would they accept that invitation to that party? How far would Daisy allow herself to fall with Leonarda leading her? Would Isolde ever be happy by being alone? Is Leonarda really who she says she is? I found this to be a quick and most enjoyable read and, like so many other authors I've recently read, I look forward to reading more of Swann's work.

EX LIBRIS!


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